Getting Your Fit On

The 5 main components of fitness are cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition. Too many Gym Bro scientists out there—who have little or no fitness training or education—try to convince the masses that cardiovascular training is not necessary. Their fix for all fitness goals is “lift more, lift heavier.” And they are wrong. Check out this link for a brief summary of the benefits of including cardio in your fitness program.

https://letlerfit.wordpress.com/2018/10/23/do-your-cardio/

Research: A Little Run Will Do Ya

The latest research seems to show that some type of aerobic activity (walking, running, etc.) before cognitive activity can improve both our short- and long-term memory function. And it does not have to be vigorous exercise to be beneficial. Also, other studies of older adults show a decreased likelihood of developing dementia if we stay relatively active rather than sedentary. Check out this link for a brief explanation.

https://www.runnersworld.com/news/a22994018/exercise-improves-memory-study

Fat vs Muscle

Two common questions among those seeking to get fit: “How do I turn this fat into muscle?” and “If I stop exercising, will my muscle turn to fat?” And the scientific answer for both questions is absolutely not. Check this link for the details.

https://www.livescience.com/60904-can-you-turn-fat-into-muscle.html

The Exercise Habit

Physical activity for health and wellness does not necessarily mean grunting and slinging weights in a smelly gym. It means we simply have to be more active than our usual lifestyle. The goal is moderate activity (raise our heart rate & sweat a bit) about 150 minutes per week. That is about 30 minutes per day, 5 days per week. And it can be done in three 10-minutes bouts per day. Make exercise a habit.

activity

http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/prevention-wellness/exercise-fitness/exercise-basics/the-exercise-habit.html