Research: Not All Obesity Is The Same

Nearly 2,500 bariatric surgery patients in a recent study were examined for various psychological and biological variables. The results found at least 4 different subtypes of obesity among the study’s participants. Why is this important? Because the standard obesity prescription of “eat less, exercise more” may not be the best solution for everyone. Each subtype could benefit more from different, specialized treatment plans based on their subtype. Follow this link for a brief discussion of the research.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323777.php

Getting Your Fit On

The 5 main components of fitness are cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition. Too many Gym Bro scientists out there—who have little or no fitness training or education—try to convince the masses that cardiovascular training is not necessary. Their fix for all fitness goals is “lift more, lift heavier.” And they are wrong. Check out this link for a brief summary of the benefits of including cardio in your fitness program.

https://letlerfit.wordpress.com/2018/10/23/do-your-cardio/

Deciphering Those Pesky Nutrition Labels

Key to developing a healthy nutrition plan is mastering those Nutrition Facts labels on food and beverage products. Most important of all is paying attention to the Servings Per Container data. Because most product packages hold more than one serving. And the listed facts are only for one serving. Check out this link to learn how to read these labels.

https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/InteractiveNutritionFactsLabel/#intro

Keto Diet: Revisiting This Fad … Again

The true ketogenic diet is a medical treatment to be supervised by a doctor or licensed dietitian. For a short list of specific medical maladies. For a limited period of time. It is not designed to be used by just anyone and everyone as a daily diet. True, the human body can be “tricked” into a ketogenic state (switching from carbohydrates to fats for primary fuel source). But that adaptation is an emergency state, not a natural state. Much like the body adapting to infections by developing fevers. Check out this link for a brief discussion on the potential dangers of a keto lifestyle.

https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/should-you-try-the-keto-diet

Nutrition: Beware The Generic “Personalization”

For a high cost—and sometimes a biological sample—some entrepreneurs promise to build our very own, individualized nutrition plan, according to our unique body chemistry. Wow. Sounds great! Right? Well … not so fast. According to this linked article from the Center for Science in the Public Interest, much of the success of these personal services may be the result of following the zero cost advice of standard dietary guidelines: reduce added sugar and refined grains … and eat more fruits and vegetables.

https://www.nutritionaction.com/daily/how-to-diet/when-nutrition-gets-personal/

Let’s Get Physical

The current recommended physical activity guidelines for adults include at least 150 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous cardiorespiratory activity (brisk walkiing) and at least 2 days per week of resistance (weight-bearing) exercise. Accomplishing these goals, we can significantly reduce our susceptibility to insuline resistance, a contributing factor of metabolic syndrome. But even some cardio and weight training proves to be better than none at all. Read this short article for details.

http://www.cooperinstitute.org/2018/05/10/can-just-a-little-bit-of-resistance-training-help-to-prevent-metabolic-syndrome

We Can Eat Meat

Consumed correctly, meats can be vital for our daily nutrition. Being careful to select the right types and limiting the portions, meats are healthy food choices. Oh … and eggs can be healthy, too. Use this link for details.