Commentary: Yes, You Need Cardio For Fat Loss

It seems popular lately to spread the idea that we do not need steady state cardio (walking, jogging, swimming, etc.) in order to achieve fat loss. Many a Gym Bro insist we only need to lift weights—the heavier the better— to lose body fat, claiming excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) will do the trick. But these Gym Bros wrongly apply the EPOC science. Remember: you never see an overfat marathoner; but you see plenty of overfat lifters. Anyway, read this short linked first-person account of a fat loss journey involving cardio exercise.

https://www.runnersworld.com/runners-stories/a22601709/leah-eric-evans-weight-loss-transformation/

fat-loss

Exercise: Beginning High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT)

Here is a simple program to introduce high-intensity interval training (HIIT) into your cardiorespiratory exercising. Please know, however, that HIIT is not advised for beginning exercisers and should not be used more than twice per week—steady-state cardio should be used on other days. PLEASE CONSULT YOUR DOCTOR BEFORE BEGINNING ANY NEW EXERCISE PROGRAMS.

https://www.acefitness.org/education-and-resources/lifestyle/blog/3768/try-this-hiit-workout-on-the-elliptical-trainer

Basics of Interval Training

We have all heard the term. But very few fully understand what it means, much less how to implement interval training into our fitness plan. So, here is a primer (though, rather lengthy, I’m afraid) on this very popular exercise program. For one thing, it is not recommended for exercise beginners. For another, great results can still be gained using other exercise programs. PLEASE CONSULT YOUR DOCTOR BEFORE BEGINNING ANY NEW EXERCISE PROGRAM.

https://joe-cannon.com/hiit-training/

Rest: Vital For Ultimate Fitness

Muscle-building does not occur during exercise. Rather, exercise tears down muscles, which then rebuild and adapt during the post-exercise rest and recovery period. That is why, typically, specific muscle groups should not be worked on consecutive days. They should be allowed to recover for at least 48 hours, though 72 hours is generally best. The link below explains the scientific process.

https://www.unm.edu/~lkravitz/Article%20folder/recoveryUNM.html