Commentary: Keeping It Real

As discussed here just last week, it is difficult to determine a universal exercise and nutrition program that works perfectly for everyone. Because our body chemistry is unique to us and not everyone enjoys the same results. However, as detailed in the link below, key to successful health and fitness is the What (general guidelines) rather than the How (detailed instructions). For examples, what we should focus on is: exercise (not so much which exercises); eat less (portion control versus specific diet or calorie counting); drink more water; eat more plants (without worrying about which specific fruits & vegetables); and other ideas. Let’s not stomp on the ants while the elephants are getting away.

http://www.leanminded.com/single-post/2019/01/09/Optimizing-your-Fat-Loss-The-Negotiable-vs-The-Non-negotiable

Commentary: Yes, You Need Cardio For Fat Loss

It seems popular lately to spread the idea that we do not need steady state cardio (walking, jogging, swimming, etc.) in order to achieve fat loss. Many a Gym Bro insist we only need to lift weights—the heavier the better— to lose body fat, claiming excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) will do the trick. But these Gym Bros wrongly apply the EPOC science. Remember: you never see an overfat marathoner; but you see plenty of overfat lifters. Anyway, read this short linked first-person account of a fat loss journey involving cardio exercise.

https://www.runnersworld.com/runners-stories/a22601709/leah-eric-evans-weight-loss-transformation/

fat-loss

Avoiding Gym Bro Science and Low-Carb Diets

Many who seek fat loss too often rely on exercise and nutrition advice from their body-building brother-in-law. But body builders, especially competitive body builders, design their routines to bulk up. Which is not the goal of most people. And common mantra of weight lifters is “high-protein/low-carb” dieting. But the body needs carbohydrates for energy. Check out this article from the National Academy of Sports Medicine.

http://blog.nasm.org/nutrition/myths-weight-management-high-protein-low-carb/